Andy_Warhol._Liz_#3_[Early_Colored_Liz],

Warhol began using publicity photographs of actress Elizabeth Taylor in early 1962. Drawn to her celebrity as well as the public spectacle of her failed marriages, love affairs and near-death experience that occurred while filming Cleopatra (1963), this tightly cropped close-up of her face set against a vividly colored background is part of a series of 13. This was Warhol’s first use of the 40-by-40 inch canvas size, a format he would return to a decade later for his commissioned portraits.

 

Photo credit: Andy Warhol. Liz #3 [Early Colored Liz], 1963. The Art Institute of Chicago, Gift of Edlis Neeson Collection. © 2019 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Liz #3 [Early Colored Liz] (1963)

Andy_Warhol._Flowers,_1964._The_Art_Inst

Warhol began his series of Flower paintings in 1964, creating them with a systematic process. With the help of assistants, he screen printed an image from a magazine of four hibiscus flowers onto more than 500 individual canvases, methodically reproducing it in different sizes and seemingly endless color combinations. In doing so, Warhol invoked standard consumer-culture proportions for the first time—small, medium, large, and extra-large—as well as the art-historical concepts of theme and variation.

 

Photo credit: Andy Warhol. Flowers, 1964. The Art Institute of Chicago, Gift of Edlis Neeson Collection. © 2019 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Flowers (1964)

Andy_Warhol._Shot_Orange_Marilyn,_1964._

Warhol began his Marilyn Monroe portraits shortly after the star’s death in 1962. Their source was a publicity photo for the film Niagara (1953), which he cropped and enlarged. Unlike his Elizabeth Taylor paintings, which featured several different images of the actress across her career, Warhol only used this image of Monroe. Warhol stored all five paintings from this series at the Factory, his Manhattan studio. In 1964 Dorothy Podber entered the Factory, aimed a gun at a stack of Marilyn paintings, and discharged a bullet that pierced several of the canvases. Despite this work’s title, there is no evidence it was shot during that episode.

 

Photo credit: Andy Warhol. Shot Orange Marilyn, 1964. Private Collection. © 2019 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Shot Orange Marilyn (1964)

Andy_Warhol,_Cow_Wallpaper_[Pink_on_Yell

For his 1971 retrospective held at the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, Warhol instructed that all of the works be hung on his Cow Wallpaper. First shown in 1966 at the Castelli Gallery in New York, Warhol’s two-room exhibition featured a room filled with silver helium balloons, titled Silver Clouds, and another covered in Cow Wallpaper. He described the former as paintings that could “float away,” and the flagrantly decorative quality of the latter underscored the fact that Warhol would not be bound by the limits of any one artistic medium.

 

Photo credit: Andy Warhol, Cow Wallpaper [Pink on Yellow], 1966. The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh. © 2019 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Cow Wallpaper (1966)

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